Our Sense of Community and Country Begins at Home | Janice Ellis
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Our Sense of Community and Country Begins at Home

our sense of community and country begins at home

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The first holiday of summer, Memorial Day, is a great demonstration of how our sense of community and country begins at home. At least it should. It is also a time to see, on display, our sense of respect, duty, and honor.

Now that the picnics and patriotic activities are over, we as Americans should be filled with the real meaning of why we pause to remember those who have paid the ultimate price to keep this country secure, to enable us to continue to live free. It is more than a national holiday, a tradition.

The lasting question is: what are we to do as recipients, as beneficiaries of those who paid the ultimate price on our behalf, for our well-being? What can we do to live up to, and be deserving? Our sense community and country begins at home.  So does our sense of self and our fellowman.

We can do a lot. We can commit and give something back in exchange for this gift of life, for the freedoms we enjoy.

Where and how do we begin? The old adage, “Everything begins at home” rings true when we think about it.  Our sense of community and country begins at home.

our sense of community and country begins at home

Our Sense of Community and Country Begins at Home. Photo Credit: 3D_generator

It can be argued that what is happening in the community in which we live, and in communities all across America, is a direct result of the foundation we passed, or failed to pass, onto our children in the home environment—from one generation to the other, directly or indirectly; what our children are taught, or learn by association have far-reaching impact, lasting consequences.

It is in the home that a child first develops a sense of self, whether they feel worthy or unworthy; a sense of family, whether it is a safe and loving place, or one filled with strife and dissension.

It is in the home where one gains a sense of how he/she is to treat a neighbor, a stranger; a sense of how to care for and promote the well-being of the community, the country.

But irrespective of our views about government, taxes, and the current state of politics on the local or national stage, what are we doing—each of us—to pass on a sense of the things that really count to those whom we can influence. There are people all around each of us that we are influencing whether we are aware of it, or not.

Our sense of community and country begins at home. What messages are we sending, what examples are we setting when it comes to:

our sense of community and country begins at home

Our Sense of Community and Country Begins at Home. Photo Credit: Zinkevych

How we should see and treat our fellowman, irrespective of the place of their birth, irrespective of their station in life, irrespective of the color of their skin, irrespective of their political or religious persuasion.

What are we teaching our children, and how are we leading by example, when it comes to our shared responsibilities for the well-being of our family, our fellowman, our community, our country? How do we transfer a sense of respect, honor, duty?

No doubt, there is more than one way to address these important areas of nurturing. But, what an awesome responsibility each of us has, and that we all share. Our sense of community and country begins at home.

Feature Photo Credit: g-stockstudio

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Our Sense of Community and Country Begins at Home
Janice Ellis
Janice Ellis
Janice S. Ellis, PhD, is an award-winning author. Her book, From Liberty to Magnolia: In Search of the American Dream is available on Amazon, Barnes and Noble and other major book sellers. She has written a column for newspapers, radio, and now online, where she analyzes educational, political, social and economic issues across race, ethnicity, age and socio-economic status. You can see her writings on this website.

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