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Women Continue to Make Society Better

Women Continue to Make Society Better Photo Credit: Drazen Zigic

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In 2022, there are many areas, professions, or important roles where women continue to make society better. But is it being captured, recognized and taught as it rightfully should?  One month is not enough. It should occur naturally as we go about our daily lives.

One could ask why do the inequities, marginalization, disrespect, disregard continue for women, not only in America but in many countries?  

For centuries and across generations, a lot of misunderstanding, resistance, and obstruction that women have faced and endured, and continue to do so, in their quest for equality have been based upon the misguided notion that women want to be men.  

Women do not want to be men. What they want, have fought for, and continue to fight for are: equal access to an education, equal pay for doing the same job, equal respect and freedom from sexual harassment and sexual abuse in the home and in the workplace. Nonetheless, women continue to make society better. 

Fifty years ago, women, through the Women’s Liberation Movement in the late 1960s and early 1970s, were fighting to gain equal access and equal opportunity in the workplace. They wanted to be recognized for their abilities to be more than sex objects, housewives and mothers.  

While gains have been made in women having access to more job opportunities and breaking out of many stereotypical roles in the workplace, they still have a long way to go when it comes to receiving equal pay, promotion to senior/CEO level positions, and corporate board representation. But women continue to make society better. 

During the fight to gain equality and respect for their abilities, many times women have had to project attributes—from dressing to speech—to prove they are just as smart, just as capable as men. Women do not want to be men. They want to be themselves and not be penalized or degraded for it. 

The MeToo movement, which continues, seeks to end sexual harassment and abuse in the workplace. Despite the disrespect and violations, and through it all, women continue to make society better.

Women Continue to Make Society Better

Women Continue to Make Society Better
Photo Credit: Rawpixel Ltd

Men and women can work together with mutual respect and share in the benefits of equal treatment across the board without losing identity that is uniquely theirs.   

So, what are some take-aways as we come to the close of another Women’s History month?  

Did your knowledge, understanding, and appreciation increase about the roles women have played in society since creation and more importantly since the founding of America?  

Does this new awareness inspire a change in perception and behavior as you interact with the girls and women in your life—at home, in the workplace, in your daily encounters?  Women continue to make society better. 

Is this month-long celebration a source of inspiration to bring about meaningful change to correct the systemic disregard, disrespect and inequities that are played out daily?  

We know that one month is not enough.  Every day and in some way, women continue to make society better. 

So, if the commemoration doesn’t serve to inspire and motivate us to work toward improving the conditions and positions of all women, why have we bothered?  

Simply to run through the paces, assuage some guilt momentarily, to give license and comfort to continue as usual the disregard, the marginalization, the disrespect?  

We hope for progress in the days, months, and years ahead.  

As women continue to make society better, will it be routinely forgotten, dismissed, until the next Women’s History Month? 

Women Continue to Make Society Better

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Janice Ellis
Janice Ellis
Janice S. Ellis, PhD, is an award-winning author. Her book, From Liberty to Magnolia: In Search of the American Dream is available on Amazon, Barnes and Noble and other major book sellers. She has written a column for newspapers, radio, and now online, where she analyzes educational, political, social and economic issues across race, ethnicity, age and socio-economic status. You can see her writings on this website.

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