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Misleading the Public Is Very Dangerous and Destructive

misleading the public is very dangerous and destructive

Misleading the Public Is Very Dangerous and Destructive Photo Credit: Mike_Kiev

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Why is it that so many of our trusted leaders do not realize that misleading the public is very dangerous and destructive? When you hear the constant barrage of false and misleading information, it leaves you scratching your head wondering what good do the perpetrators expect to get out of it. One can easily conclude that it must be for some selfish agenda, some selfish gain.

But at what costs? Just look at the negative consequences that have occurred across our nation as a result of supposedly caring leaders constantly pushing exaggerated, one-sided, distorted, and downright false information to a vulnerable public. Sadly, they take advantage of a public that is relying on those in charge to tell the truth, to lead the way, to advise on what should be supported as well as what should not be supported.

Misleading the public is very dangerous and destructive. And at what costs? The greatest example that we have seen this play out is with the Covid pandemic that still rages. Had the public been told factual and accurate information as leaders became aware of it, the outcomes when it comes to the scale of infections, deaths, loss of jobs and a devastated economy could have been minimized. False information about wearing masks and taking vaccines remains a challenge. Many elected officials and leaders bear responsibility.

Misleading the Public Is Very Dangerous and Destructive

Misleading the Public Is Very Dangerous and Destructive.
Photo Credit: stuartmiles99

Then, of course, there are the ongoing misleading and false information being kept alive about the 2020 Presidential election. How the election was stolen, how fraudulent voting was rampant. If fact, no evidence has been presented to substantiate these claims. Yet, hundreds of pieces of legislation are being introduced, whether warranted or not, to make voting more difficult for legal citizen instead of making it more convenient. Who, at the end of the day will pay for this? Misleading the public is very dangerous and destructive, which ends up being very costly in so many ways.

So, what are we, a trusting public, to do? Many major issues we face as a country, as a society, can be traced back to the proliferation of information that has been distorted, incomplete, and manipulated for reasons other than what is in the public’s best interest. Whether it is increased violence, racial unrest, distrust in government, etc. Sit a while, pick one issue and think about what you believe, and why. What is the source(s) of your information and knowledge?

Misleading the public is very dangerous and destructive. What can we do about it? It is up to each of us to take responsibility to always seek the truth. We can start by always examining what we hear, what we see, what we read. We cannot be gullible consumers.

The saying, “information is power” is no longer true in the climate of misinformation that we live in today. It must be replace by “Accurate information is power.” Accurate information should rule the day and guide our decisions and actions.

Misleading the Public Is Very Dangerous and Destructive

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Janice Ellis
Janice Ellis
Janice S. Ellis, PhD, is an award-winning author. Her book, From Liberty to Magnolia: In Search of the American Dream is available on Amazon, Barnes and Noble and other major book sellers. She has written a column for newspapers, radio, and now online, where she analyzes educational, political, social and economic issues across race, ethnicity, age and socio-economic status. You can see her writings on this website.

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